WORK AND EMPLOYMENT: VOCABULARY

Work and Employment: A vocabulary list

employment
empleo
job
trabajo, empleo
work
trabajo
profession
profesión
occupation
ocupación
applicant
solicitante
application form
solicitud
CV (GB)
curriculum vitae
resume (US)
curriculum vitae
employment agency
agencia de empleo
employee
empleado
employer
empleador
boss
jefe
interview
entrevista
interviewee
entrevistado
interviewer
entrevistador
introductory letter
carta de presentación
letter of reference
carta de recomendación
personnel department
departamento de personal
qualifications
títulos, habilidades
references
referencias
responsibilities, duties
responsabilidades
post
puesto
position
puesto
vacancy
puesto vacante
salary
salario, sueldo
salary expectations
pretensiones salariales
wages
salario, sueldo
a day's wages
jornal
minimum wages
salario mínimo
nominal wages
salario mínimo
pay
salario, sueldo
payday
día de cobro
payroll
nómina o plantilla (de sueldos)
pay slip
recibo de sueldo
fringe benefits
beneficios adicionales
maternity benefits
beneficios por maternidad
bonus
bonificación, plus, prima
raise (US)
aumento (de sueldo)
rise (GB)
aumento (de sueldo)
overtime
horas extra
self-employed
autónomo
full-time job
trabajo de jornada completa
part-time job
trabajo de media jornada
temporary job
trabajo temporario
permanent job
trabajo permanente
casual job
trabajo eventual
shift work
trabajo por turnos
team work
trabajo en equipo
day shift
turno de día
evening shift
turno de tarde
graveyard shift (US)
turno de noche 
night shift
turno de noche
apprentice / trainee
aprendiz
unemployment benefit
subsidio de desempleo
to apply for a job
solicitar un trabajo
to hire somebody
contratar a alguien
to earn
ganar (el sueldo)
to work
trabajar
to work in shifts
trabajar en turnos
to work overtime
trabajar horas extra
to dismiss somebody
echar a alguien (del trabajo)
to fire somebody
echar a alguien (del trabajo)
to give somebody the sack (GB)
echar a alguien (del trabajo)
to lose a job
perder un trabajo
to leave / quit a job
dejar un trabajo, renunciar
to hand in one's notice
presentar la renuncia
to resign
renunciar, dimitir
to be unemployed
estar desempleado / en el paro
to be out of work
estar desempleado / en el paro
to be on the dole (GB)
estar desempleado y cobrar el subsidio de desempleo

US=American English GB=British English

You can listen to the pronunciation of each word/expression by clicking on this link:

You can also see and listen to an extended list of proffesions by clicking on this link:

ENCONTRADO EN: www.saberingles.com.ar

WOULD YOU DARE TO QUESTION WHO YOU REALLY ARE? - THE DNA JOURNEY BY MOMONDO

Our DNA reveals so much about where we come from. Most of us are far more diverse and have much more in common with people from other countries than we would ever have thought. The DNA Journey by Momondo pursues to make people understand that there are more things uniting us, than dividing us.


A TRAVÉS DE: www.youtube.com/LetsOpenOurWorld

Other sources: www.momondo.com

HOW TO WRITE A GOOD ESSAY: PARAPHRASING THE QUESTION

"BY" OR "WITH"?

SPEAK FASTER AND MORE NATURALLY WITH CONNECTED SPEECH

THE NATIONAL FLOWERS OF EUROPE

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN "CAN" AND "BE ABLE TO"

Difference between can and be able to
Both can and be able to can be used to talk about ability. In some cases they are interchangeable.
Using can
Can is used in the present tense. It is used to talk about our ability to do things.
Examples
·         I can swim.
·         She can speak English well.
·         I can swim across that stream.



Be able to is also possible in these cases; however, it sounds a bit more formal here.
·         I am able to knit. (Less natural than ‘I can knit.’)
·         She is able to speak English well.
To talk about our past ability, we use couldWas/were able to is also possible.
Study the examples given below.
·         She could read when she was three. OR She was able to read when she was three.
Again, in spoken English, we are less likely to use was able to.
As you can see in all of these sentences, we were talking about general ability. Things that we can or we could do at any time in the present or in the past.
To talk about things that we managed to do on specific occasions in the past, we cannot use could. Instead, we use was/were able to. The verb managed, succeeded (in…ing) are also possible in this case.
·         was able to get some really good bargains in the sale. (NOT I could get some really good bargains in the sale.)
·         After climbing for several hours, we managed to get to the top of the mountain. OR After climbing for several hours, we were able to get to the top of the mountain. (NOT … we could get to the top of the mountain.)
Both could and be able to can be used to say that we were not capable of doing something on a specific occasion.
·         In spite of climbing for hours, we couldn’t get to the top of the mountain. OR In spite of climbing for hours, we weren’t able to get to the top of the mountain.




WHEN TO AVOID SAYING "SORRY"

A Cure for “I’m Sorry” Syndrome

ENCONTRADO EN: www.genial.guru

Did you ever notice that some people seem to be in a perpetual state of apology?

“I’m sorry I didn’t show up on time.”
”I’m sorry I didn’t call.”
”I’m sorry I didn’t get that done.”

This type of communication typically comes from individuals who are in the habit of making excuses for their actions. They know that they have a commitment they haven’t met, and, instead of facing the music, they choose to say “I’m sorry” to skirt the issue.

Think about how you feel when you hear this merry-go-round of excuses. During this ride, on the way up there is a feeling that the person has noticed their poor behavior and will make changes; the way down, however, quickly follows — when you realize no change is coming. This is a ride that no one wants to buy a ticket to get on!

Where does this behavior, come from? A look at our childhood offers us clues. As children we are taught to say “I’m sorry” whenever we have failed to meet the expectations of others.

“I’m sorry I didn’t clean my room.””I’m sorry I didn’t do my homework.””I’m sorry I wasn’t home on time.”

We are indoctrinated as children to pacify adults with apologies to get them off our backs. We quickly learn that “I’m sorry” ends the uncomfortable situation, making us free to move on to other things.

Because this behavior works, we carry it into adulthood. We then easily offer up an “I’m sorry” in any situation where the expectations of us are greater than our performance. We learn that by saying “I’m sorry” we can smooth out, or pacify, potential rough spots.

What is lacking when an “I’m sorry” is offered? The commitment to make a positive change. A better alternative to constantly saying “I’m sorry” is to replace those excuses with behaviors that will create positive outcomes:

Excuse Offered Alternative Behavior: “I’m sorry I didn’t show up on time.” Choose to be punctual.”I’m sorry I didn’t call.” Make the phone call. “I’m sorry I didn’t get that done.” Choose to do it.

Remember, the quality of our life is in direct proportion to the choices that we make and how we act on them. Part of building healthy self-esteem is to make promises that you will keep. When you over-promise and under-deliver, you are negatively affected: you suffer a feeling of low self-confidence and lack of control. Furthermore, the person on the receiving end of your excuse is left doubting your word and loses confidence in your ability to perform.

So when is it appropriate to say “I’m sorry?” For example, “I’m sorry I hurt your feelings. Next time I’ll think about what I’m going to say before I say it.” Although you have used the magic words “I’m sorry” you have acknowledged the negative affect your behavior has had on the other person. You’ve also indicated to that person your commitment to improve your behavior in the future.

Just think about what it would mean if everyone would live their life so they wouldn’t have to say “I’m sorry.” When we heard a promise, we could expect it to be delivered. And when we offered others our word, they could expect the same promise to be fulfilled.

Today, make a commitment to examine how and why you use “I’m sorry.” By doing so you will make the first step toward self-diagnosing and curing “I’m Sorry Syndrome.”

Author: Dr. Susanne Gaddis
The Communications Doctor

LONDON FIREWORKS 2016 / 2017 - NEW YEAR'S EVE FIREWORKS


A TRAVÉS DE: www.youtube.com/BBC