PHRASAL VERBS AROUND THE HOUSE

DYNAMIC VERBS (ALSO KNOWN AS ACTION VERBS) VS. STATIVE VERBS (ALSO KNOWN AS STATE VERBS)

The most important reason you need to know about these is because stative verbs can't usually be used in the progressive form. But more about that later!

Firstly, what do the words "dynamic" and "stative" mean?  

They aren't very common words in everyday English, but they are grammar terms you will need to know to understand this subject. 

Dynamic

"Dynamic" is an adjective which means something is moving or changing. 

In English grammar a "dynamic verb" means that the verb describes an action rather than a state. Dynamic verbs are sometimes known as "action verbs."

"Joe is chasing the bus."

Stative

"Stative" is an adjective which describes something as having a state, or existing (this is a very uncommon adjective). 

In English grammar a "stative verb" means that the verb describes a state rather than an action.

Stative verbs are sometimes known as "state verbs." 

"Kevin wants some ice-cream."

So now you know the meaning of the terms, let's look at some examples!

First, here is a list of some dynamic verbs. You can see that they are all used to describe an action, change, or process. Most of them are used to describe an activity which has a start and an end. 

Examples of dynamic verbs:
  • eat
  • walk
  • learn
  • grow
  • sleep
  • talk
  • write
  • run
  • read
  • become
  • go
These words can all be used in the progressive form. 

Example sentences with dynamic verbs:
  • "I can't talk right now, I'm eating dinner."
Present progressive used to describe an action happening now.
  • "Sorry, I'm out of breath because I've been running."
Present perfect progressive used to describe an action that started in the past, continued for some time and has results now.
  • "I didn't steal the necklace! I was sleeping when someone broke into the shop!"
Past progressive used to talk about an action that was happening at a particular time in the past.
Here is a list of some of the stative verbs. Some of these describe relationships between things or people (for example, own) and some describe emotions or states of mind.

Examples of stative verbs:
  • love
  • hate
  • like
  • prefer
  • doubt
  • seem
  • know
  • own
  • understand
Here are some examples, showing that these words cannot be used in the progressive form.

Correct: "I like chocolate, but I prefer cake."
Incorrect: "I'm liking chocolate but I'm preferring cake."

Correct: "I don't understand you when you speak quickly."
Incorrect: "I'm not understanding you when you speak quickly."

There are also some verbs that can be either dynamic or stative, depending on their meaning and context in the sentence. I'm sure you know by now that there are many words in English that can have more than one meaning!

Examples of verbs that can be either dynamic or stative:
  • think
  • mind
  • have
  • smell
  • sound


Let's look at some examples of how these verbs are used differently.

Example sentences:
  • "I think it is wrong to hit children."
Here, think is a stative verb. It means "to have an opinion" and it cannot be used in the progressive form in this case.

BUT

"I'm thinking about buying a new car."
Here, thinking is describing a process, or an action. This is something that is happening, rather than simply being. So here we can use the progressive form.
  • "I don't mind if we watch a movie tonight." 
Here, mind means "be bothered by", which is a state of mind, not an action. Therefore, it is stative.

BUT

"I'm not being nosy. I'm minding my own business!" 
Here, minding means "looking after" and is therefore a process and a dynamic verb.
  • "I have three brothers." 
Have here talks about the family relationship the speaker has with her brothers and is therefore stative.

BUT

"I'm having a bad day today. I'll call you when things are better." 

Having in this sentence means the speaker is going through the process of a bad day. It is therefore dynamic.

All this may seem complicated, but if you read and listen to as much English as you can, you will soon start to know which verbs sound right in the progressive. If you keep the basic idea of dynamic verbs vs. static verbs in the back of your mind, it will help you greatly.

ADAPTADO DESDE: www.really-learn-english.com
 

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HOW TO USE "EITHER" AND "NEITHER" IN ENGLISH

The English words either and neither can cause some problems for native and non-native speakers of English. Sometimes you can use either one and sometimes you have to choose either one or the other, but neither one is very difficult.

Either… Or

Either... or is used to offer a choice between two possibilities:
Either Mike or Lisa will be there.
Either you leave me alone or I will call the police.
We should bring either coffee or tea.
You can either help us or go to your room.

Either can also be followed by (one) of + group of two:
Either of us could do it
Either one of us could do it
Either of you should know
Either one of you should know

Not… either… or denies both possibilities:
I don’t think either Mike or Lisa will be there.
He doesn’t speak either English or French.

Not… either is used after a negative statement.
I don’t speak French.
You don’t either.
He isn’t ready to go.
We aren’t either.

Neither… Nor

Neither… nor is equivalent to not… either… or.
Neither Mike nor Lisa will be there.
He speaks neither English nor French.
We brought neither coffee nor tea.
I will neither help you nor go to my room.

Neither can also be followed by (one) of + group of two:
Neither of them is ready.
Neither one of them is ready.
Neither of us has any money.
Neither one of us has any money.

Neither is used like not… either.
I don’t speak French.
Neither do I.
(informal): Me neither.
He isn’t ready to go. 
Neither are we.
 



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CAUSATIVE VERBS: MAKE, HAVE, LET, GET, HELP

Causative Verbs In English: Let, Make, Have, Get, Help
 
The English verbs let, make, have, get, and help are called causative verbs because they cause something else to happen.
 
Here are some specific examples of how causative verbs work in English sentences.

How To Use Causative Verbs In English:
LET = Permit Something To Happen
 
Grammatical structure:

LET + PERSON/THING + VERB (base form)

Examples:

- I don’t let my kids watch violent movies.
- Mary’s father won’t let her adopt a puppy because he’s allergic to dogs.
- Our boss doesn’t let us eat lunch at our desks; we have to eat in the cafeteria.
- Oops! I wasn’t paying attention while cooking, and I let the food burn.
- Don’t let the advertising expenses surpass $1000.
- Remember: The past tense of let is also let; there is no change!
 
Note: The verbs allow and permit are more formal ways to say “let.” However, with allow and permit, we use to + verb:

- I don’t allow my kids to watch violent movies.
- Our boss doesn’t permit us to eat lunch at our desks.
 
MAKE = Force Or Require Someone To Take An Action
 
Grammatical structure:

MAKE + PERSON + VERB (base form)
Examples:

- After Billy broke the neighbor’s window, his parents made him pay for it.
- My ex-boyfriend loved sci-fi and made me watch every episode of his favorite show.
- The teacher made all the students rewrite their papers, because the first drafts were not acceptable.
 
Note: When using the verbs force and require, we must use to + verb:

- The school requires the students to wear uniforms.
  “Require” often implies that there is a rule.
- The hijacker forced the pilots to take the plane in a different direction.
  “Force” often implies violence, threats, or extremely strong pressure.
 
HAVE = Give Someone Else The Responsibility To Do Something
Grammatical structure:

HAVE + PERSON + VERB (base form)
HAVE + THING + PAST PARTICIPLE OF VERB
Examples of grammatical structure #1:

- I’ll have my assistant call you to reschedule the appointment.
- The businessman had his secretary make copies of the report.
 
Examples of grammatical structure #2:

- I’m going to have my hair cut tomorrow.
- We’re having our house painted this weekend.
- Bob had his teeth whitened; his smile looks great!
- My washing machine is broken; I need to have it repaired.
Note: In informal speech, we often use get in these cases:

- I’m going to get my hair cut tomorrow.
- We’re getting our house painted this weekend.
- Bob got his teeth whitened; his smile looks great!
- My washing machine is broken; I need to get it repaired.
 
GET = Convince / Encourage Someone To Do Something
Grammatical structure:

GET + PERSON + TO + VERB

Examples:

- How can we get all the employees to arrive on time?
- My husband hates housework; I can never get him to wash the dishes!
- I was nervous about eating sushi, but my brother got me to try it at a Japanese restaurant.
- The non-profit got a professional photographer to take photos at the event for free.
 
HELP = Assist Someone In Doing Something
 
Grammatical structure:

HELP + PERSON + VERB (base form)
HELP + PERSON + TO + VERB
After “help,” you can use “to” or not – both ways are correct. In general, the form without “to” is more common:

- He helped me carry the boxes.
- He helped me to carry the boxes.
- Reading before bed helps me relax.
- Reading before bed helps me to relax.

ENCONTRADO EN: www.expressoenglish.net


NUEVE PELÍCULAS PARA AQUELLOS QUE ESTÁN APRENDIENDO INGLÉS

Existen varios métodos para aprender un idioma extranjero, pero solamente uno que nunca falla: el cine.
 
He aquí algunas películas cuya visualización en el idioma original te ayudará a asimilar nuevas palabras y reforzar tu conocimiento del inglés.
1) Forrest Gump
 
 
Es uno de los filmes más reconocidos en la historia del cine y es excelente para aquellas personas que quieren perfeccionar su inglés viendo películas. Es una cinta muy sencilla y entendible. Tom Hanks habla despacio, pronunciando palabras con claridad, por lo que incluso los principiantes pueden lograr entenderlo.

2) Pulp Fiction
 
 
Tarantino no sólo es el nombre de un director de cine, es todo un universo. Esta película ya la hemos visto tantas veces que podemos citar algunas frases de memoria. Pero resulta que esta cinta también es excelente para aprender el idioma. Especialmente si te interesa aprender las frases y expresiones poco convencionales y algo groseras.
 
3) La casa del lago / The Lake House
 
 
Es una de las mejores películas para asimilar el lenguaje escrito y el vocabulario romántico. Dos personajes, dos tiempos distintos y un buzón. ¿Te estás preparando para un intercambio de correos románticos con tu pareja del extranjero? Entonces Keanu Reeves y Sandra Bullock te enseñarán cómo se escriben las cartas correctamente.
 
4) La bella y la bestia / Beauty and the Beast
 
 
Es una linda película que todos queremos desde nuestra infancia, y es una excelente elección para los principiantes. Los personajes tienen una pronunciación muy clara, utilizan palabras sencillas, por lo tanto todos los que tienen algunos conocimientos del idioma podrán entenderlo sin mayores problemas.
 
5) Café y cigarrillos / Coffee and Cigarettes
 

Esta película ofrece un gran campo para la práctica auditiva del idioma. Tiene muchos diálogos, discusiones y bromas divertidas. Pero no solamente es una muestra de una charla entre amigos, también aquellos que preparan su cerebro para conversaciones más intelectuales valorarán esta cinta.
 
6) Jerry Maguire
 
 
¿Sueñas con trabajar en una empresa grande? Esta película te puede enseñar cómo hacerte un camino usando tan solo el idioma. Jerry Maguire te enseñará no sólo a decir cosas correctas sino también a formular ideas adecuadas. Una gran cantidad de reflexiones.
7) La dama de hierro / The Iron Lady
 

Siempre es útil aprender de historia, y aún más útil la del país donde hablan el idioma que estás adquiriendo. Por lo tanto, la película sobre la vida de Margaret Thatcher, protagonizada por la incomparable Meryl Streep, vale tu atención. Además, es como tener una clase de inglés académico cuyo uso es extremadamente correcto y decorado con el acento británico que a veces es más fácil de entender que el americano.
 
8) El diario de Bridget Jones / Bridget Jones’s Diary
 

La historia de Bridget de 32 años, quien decide cambiar su vida, es otra película excelente para el aprendizaje del inglés. Los diálogos no son complicados y la pronunciación de Rene Zellweger es muy clara. Un dato curioso: para volver su acento «inglés» más natural, Rene no dejaba de usarlo en la vida cotidiana, incluso fuera del set.
 
9) Shrek
 

Es una animación muy divertida que es buena tanto para los niños como para los adultos. Los actores utilizan réplicas cortas y sencillas con una pronunciación clara. Además, la gran cantidad de bromas y canciones no dejará que te aburras.
 
ADAPTADO DESDE: www.genial.guru
 

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