Wednesday, 21 December 2016

THE CHRISTMAS QUIZ

Monday, 19 December 2016

PINK - GLITTER IN THE AIR (WITH LYRICS AND ONLINE EXERCISES)



CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW TO GO TO ONLINE EXERCISES ON THIS SONG:

Thursday, 15 December 2016

JOBS CROSSWORD

CLICK ON THE IMAGE BELOW TO GO TO THIS FUN JOBS CROSSWORD (EXTERNAL LINK):

ENCONTRADO EN: www.eslgamesplus.com

Wednesday, 14 December 2016

CHRISTMAS VOCABULARY GAME

COMPARATIVES AND SUPERLATIVES: A CLEAR VIEW

CREATED BY VALANGLIA

Friday, 9 December 2016

SOMEWHERE OVER THE RAINBOW - THE WIZARD OF OZ

Thursday, 8 December 2016

WRITING A MAGAZINE ARTICLE: AN EXAMPLE AND SOME GENERAL TIPS


CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW FOR ITS RELATED ONLINE EXERCISES:

OTHER GENERAL TIPS ON WRITING A MAGAZINE ARTICLE (EXTENSION):

STEP 1: SELECT YOUR TOPIC.
Choose a topic that interests you enough to focus on it for at least a week or two. If your topic is broad, narrow it. Instead of writing about how to decorate your home, try covering how to decorate your home in country style on a shoestring budget. That’s more specific and, as such, easier to tackle.


Then write a rough, rough draft, including everything you can think of. Stay loose, avoid getting analytical, and enjoy the process of sharing what you know. When you’re done, you’ll have the bare bones of an article that only you could write. Then put it aside for a while.

STEP 2: ADDRESS YOUR AUDIENCE’S NEEDS.
Now, come back to your piece. Switch gears and imagine you’re the reader of this article. Pick three words to describe the audience you want to address (e.g., professionals, single men). As this reader, what questions would you like answered? You might not know the answers yet, but list the questions anyway; you’ll find answers in the next step.

STEP 3: RESEARCH.
Research will ground your article in fact. Good details to include with your how-to are:
  • Statistics
  • Quotes by well-known people
  • Definitions
  • Anecdotes (short, illustrative stories about yourself or someone else)
  • Quotes and examples from people like the reader or from popular books on the subject
  • References to other media (film, television, radio)
  • Helpful tools, resources or products (if many, consider creating a sidebar)
  • References to local venues or events (if for a regional/local publication).

Collect everything you have gathered and put it in a folder, an electronic document, a notebook or whatever you like. Don’t forget to keep track of sources in case you are later asked by an editor to verify them. You may want to sift through your research at a separate sitting from gathering it. Or just go ahead and sprinkle your research in right when you find it. It’s a lot like cooking—play around until you feel you have it “just right.”

STEP 4: TIGHTEN YOUR DRAFT.
Keeping your audience in mind, write a tighter draft incorporating the new supporting information you’ve collected. Sometimes what you’ve learned in Steps 2 and 3 may compel you to start over with a completely fresh draft. Or you may just want to revise what you have as you proceed, retaining a nice conversational tone by directly addressing your audience.


This time when you read your draft, ask yourself: Is it working? Is it too general, too lightweight, uninteresting, unclear or choppy? If so, comb some of your favorite publications for how-to articles. What techniques are those writers using that you might employ?

STEP 5: MAKE IT SPECIFIC.
Double-check to see that you’ve included every pertinent step in the process. How-to articles have to be thorough. You want your reader to walk away knowing exactly how to make that Thanksgiving dinner on a shoestring budget, execute that rugby tackle or locate great accommodations.


If your narrative goes on and on, or off in too many directions, break it down into key points indicated with subheads (as in this article). Synthesizing complicated information and breaking it down into steps is especially crucial for online writing, and is also a trend in print.

STEP 6: READ, REVISE, REPEAT.
Read the draft of your how-to article out loud to a supportive friend. Then, ask her a series of questions: Does she now understand the process? Are there any steps missing? Is there anything else she would like to know about the subject? Could she do the task herself? With your friend’s suggestions in mind, use your best judgment in deciding what changes, if any, need to be made.


Here’s a quick list to help you catch errors or omissions:
  • Did you adequately describe the ingredients/supplies needed in order for the reader to complete the task?
  • Did you include all the important steps?
  • Is the order logical?
  • Did you use words that indicate sequence: first, next, then?
  • Did you warn readers of possible pitfalls?


Rewrite, read aloud, rewrite, read aloud, rewrite, find a proofreader and, only when you’re satisfied you’ve written an effective how-to article, submit your piece to an appropriate publication with a short cover letter.

ENCONTRADO EN: www.writersdigest.com

REGLAS GENERALES DE PRONUNCIACIÓN EN INGLÉS

LETRA
PRONUN
CIACIÓN
OBSERVACIONES
EJEMPLOS
a
ei
a) Cuando es tónica a final de sílaba o seguida de consonante
e muda.
fate (féit), destino
agent (éidchent), agente
b) Antes de mbncing y ste
chamber (chéimbar), cámara
ancient (éinchent), antiguo
change (chéinch), cambio
waste (uéist), derrochar

o
a) Antes de l o ll

b) Antes o después de w 
already (olrédi), ya

water (uóter), agua; law (ló:), ley

a
Antes de r
far (fá:r), lejos

e
i
Cuando es tónica a final de sílaba o seguida de consonante y muda.
scene (sí:n), escena
me (mí), a mí
the (dí), el, la, los, las

e
En las demás palabras unas veces suena como e abierta y otras como e cerrada francesa.
meridian (merídian), meridiano
meter (míte:r), metro
i
ai
a) Cuando es tónica a final de sílaba o seguida de consonante
e muda.
pine (páin), pino
idol (áidol), ídolo
idle (áidl) haragán
b) Antes de ghghtgnld y nd
high (jái), alto; night (náit), noche
sign (sáin), firmar; mild (máild), tibio
find (fáind), encontrar
c) En algunos monosílabos y en las voces en que precede a una
o
 más consonantes seguidas de
e
 muda.
(ái), yo
biography (baiógrafi), biografía
globalize (globaláis), globalizar
licence (láisens), permiso

i
d) Cuando no va seguida de muda. 
pin (pín), alfiler
fin (fín), aleta

ae
francesa
e) Cuando va seguida de r 
sir (sér), señor; first (férst), primero
o
ou
a) Cuando es tónica a final de sílaba o seguida de consonante
e muda.
vote (vóut), voto
open (óupen), abrir
b) Antes de ldlt y st
bold (bóuld), osado; bolt (bóult),cerrojo; most (móust), mayoría

o
c) Cuando no va seguida de muda. 
boy (bói), muchacho
toy (tói), juguete

ae
francesa
d) En las palabras de más de una sílaba o terminaciones tion
admiration (admiréishon), admiración

u
e) En algunos casos como: 
who (jú), quien; do (dú), hacer;
woman (úman), mujer

f) En los siguientes verbos:
to prove (tu prúv), probar;
to move (tu múv), mover;
to lose (tu lús), perder
u
iu
a) Cuando es tónica a final de sílaba o seguida de consonante
e muda.
tune (tiún), tono
usual (iúshual), usual

u
b) En las siguientes palabras: 
rule (rúl), regla; bull (búl), toro;
crude (krúd), crudo; put (put), poner; true (trú), verdadero

c) Al final de sílaba fuerte y cuando precede a consonante seguida de e muda. 
pupil (piúpil), alumno;
tube (tiúb), tubo;
duty (diúti), deber

i
d) En algunas palabras como: 
busy (bísi), ocupado;
building (bílding), edificio

a
e) En algunas palabras como: 
under (ánder), debajo de;
unload (anlóud), descargar

ae
ea
aeroplane (eároplein), avión

ai
ei
praise (préis), alabanza
ao
ei
aorta (eiórta), aorta
au
ó
daughter (dóter), hija
ay
ei
day (déi), día
ea
i:

e
Se representa con dos puntos (:) una prolongación del sonido
de la vocal.

Seguida de una d
meat (mí:t), carne
leap (lí:p), salto


bread (bréd), pan
ee
i:
Se representa con dos puntos (:) una prolongación del sonido
de la vocal.
meeting (mí:ting), reunión
deep (dí:p), profundo
steel (stí:l), acero
eo
i
people (pípl), gente
eu
eau
ew
Europe (iúrop), Europa

beauty (biúti), belleza

news (niús), noticias
ei
ey
ei
seine (séin), red de pesca
vein (véin), vena
obey (oubéi), obedecer
prey (préi), presa
ia
ia
valiant (váliant), valiente
ie
i:
hygiene (jáiyi:n), higiene
io
áio
violin (váiolin), violín
iu
iu
stadium (stédium), estadio
oa
o:
board (bó:rd), tabla
oe
u
ou
shoe (shú), zapato

toe (tóu), dedo del pie
oi
oy
oi
noise (nóis), ruido

boy (bói), muchacho
oo
ú
ó
foot (fút), pie; good (gúd), bueno

door (dór), puerta; floor (flór), piso
ou
ow
áu
house (jáus), casa

town (táun), ciudad
ua
a:
guard (gá:rd), guardia
ue
ui
banquet (bánkuit), banquete
ui
suit (siút), traje de vestir
uo
uo
liquor (líkuor), licor
c
s
Delante de eiy
centre (sénter), centro
city (síti), ciudad
cypress (sáipres), ciprés
ch
Por sus variantes, la pronunciación de la CH inicial en inglés es todo un desafío. Sin embargo puedes guiarte por estas tres reglas básicas:
a) Las palabras de origen británico se pronuncian con sonido /tsh/.
b) Las palabras de origen griego se pronuncian con la consonante K.
c) Las palabras de origen francés se pronuncian con la CH francesa.
tsh
change (tshéinsh), cambio; check (tshék), cheque, verificar
k
chemistry (kémistri), química; chronicle (krónikl), crónica
ch
francesa
champagne (shampéin), champaña; Chopin (shopén), Chopin
g
gue
gui
Seguida de ei
get (guet), obtener
give (guiv), dar
dch
En voces francesas y clásicas.
gentleman (dchéntleman), caballero
gh
g
A principio de palabra
Es muda a fin de sílaba seguida
(o no) de t
ghost (góst), fantasma
nigh (nái), cercano
night (náit), noche
f
En los siguientes vocablos:
rough (ráf), áspero; tough (táf), duro; trough (tróf) artesa; laugh (láf), reír; draught (drá:ft), trago; cough (cóf), tos; enough (ináf), suficiente
j
dch
jovial (dchóvial), jovial
join (dchóin), juntar
ph
f
philosophy (filósofi), filosofía
th
d
Unas veces suena como d
the (dé, dí), el, la, los, las
dz
Otras veces suena como dz
o como española.
with (uíz), con
t
sch
Cuando va seguida de y especialmente en las
terminaciones tion
admiration (admiréischon), admiración; station (stéischon), estación
v
v
Tiene el sonido labiodental
fuerte.
leaves (lívs), hojas
vine (váin), viña
x
s
Al principio de la palabra.
xylophone (sáilofoun), xilófono
gs
Cuando va entre vocales.
exempt (egsémpt), exento
ks
En los demás casos.
box (bóks), caja
y
y
Tiene el sonido fricativo de la y
española.
yes (yes), sí
ai
Cuando es acentuada en medio
o a fin de dicción.
type (táip), tipo
why (juái), por qué
ENCONTRADO EN: www.ompersonal.com.ar